THOMAS

Autograph Letter Signed ('T. W. Holderness') from Sir Thomas William Holderness to Sir Henry Marshman Havelock-Allan, regarding his appointment as Permanent Under-Secretary of State for India, and his predecessor 'poor Ritchie' [Sir Richmond Ritchie]

Author: 
Sir Thomas William Holderness (1849-1924), member of the Indian Civil Service and Permanent Under-Secretary of State for India [Sir Henry Marshman Havelock-Allan (1830-1897); Sir Richmond Ritchie]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the India Office, Whitehall. 24 October [1912].
£65.00

1p., 12mo. Good, on lightly-aged paper. Tipped in onto a leaf removed from an album. Holderness's predecessor Sir Richmond Ritchie (1854-1912) had died ten days before the writing of the letter, as a result, according to the Oxford DNB, of the undermining of his health by 'unremitting hard work [...] over several years'. Holderness begins the letter: 'It is very good of you to congratulate me on succeeding to poor Ritchie's responsibilities.

Eleven manuscript items, from the papers of Thomas William King, York Herald, relating to the claim to the dormant baronetcies of Mackenzie of Tarbat and Royston by Alexander Mackenzie of Tasmania, uncle of the Dowager Lady Filmer.

Author: 
Thomas William King, York Herald [William Anderson, Marchmont Herald; Helen [née Monro; 1810-1888], Dowager Lady Filmer; Alexander Mackenzie of Tasmania; Mackenzie of Tarbat and Royston]
Publication details: 
Mostly London and Edinburgh, 1858.
£320.00

In 1826 Lieut-Col. Alexander Mackenzie, eldest son of Colonel Robert Mackenzie of Milnmount, assumed the dormant baronetcies of Tarbat and Royston [ALEXANDERMACKENZIE OF ROYSTON CROMARTY TARBET GRANDVILLE.], despite their having been forfeited under attainder in 1763. On his death without issue in 1841 his only brother Sir James Sutherland Mackenzie also assumed the titles. He died unmarried and insane on the 24 November 1858. The claim to which the present documents relate does not appear to have been pursued, and the baronetcies have remained dormant.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Max Müller') from Professor Max Muller, sending condolences to John Bellows on the death of his mother, and discussing the success of Bellows' French dictionary, Bishop Patteson, Jowett and Dr Stanley.

Author: 
Professor Friedrich Max Müller [Max Muller] (1823-1900), Sanskrit philologist [John Thomas Bellows (1831-1902), Quaker printer and lexicographer, author of first pocket French/English dictionary]
Publication details: 
On his letterhead, Parks End, Oxford. 17 November 1873.
£56.00

2pp., 12mo. Good, on lightly-aged paper. Bellows is not named, being addressed as 'My dear Friend', but the letter is from his papers. Müller writes that he feels 'every word' Bellows has to say about his mother: 'all we can say is that it was meant to be so'. He has been 'reading the Life of Patteson, the Bishop of Melanesia - an old friend of mine, and I suppose the best man I ever knew.' He laments that the book is 'very long, and will not be read by many people - but those who read it will value it for life'.

Autograph Letter Signed ('John Linnell Sen.') from the English portrait painter John Linnell to the Glasgow picture dealer Thomas Lawrie, regarding the verification of a picture ['The Woodcutters'] and describing work he will have for sale.

Author: 
John Linnell (1792-1882), English landscape and portrait painter, an associate of William Blake, Samuel Palmer and the Ancients [Thomas Lawrie, Glasgow picture dealer]
Publication details: 
Red Hill [Redhill, Surrey]. 15 December 1870.
£250.00

2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. 28 lines of text. In fair condition: aged and a little ruckled. Docketed 'The Woodcutters' (a theme around which Linnell produced several paintings). Linnell writes that he has just received Lawrie's 'half note for £5 - and will not fail to attend to your wishes about The Verification'. He explains that he usually requires, in addition to the fee, 'an assurance that I shall not be called upon personally to give evidence respecting the work said to be mine.

Typed Letter Signed from the British politician Herbert Morrison to his Labour Party colleague Tom Driberg, regarding 'the difficulties Private Donaldson says he is experiencing about his discharge from the Army'. With TLS from Driberg to Donaldson.

Author: 
Herbert Morrison [Herbert Stanley Morrison, Baron Morrison of Lambeth] (1888-1965), British Labour politician [Tom Driberg [Thomas Edward Neil Driberg] (1905-1976), Baron Bradwell; Gérard' Donaldson]
Publication details: 
Morrison's Letter to Driberg: On letterhead of the Home Secretary, Whitehall, London, SW1. 20 December 1944. Driberg's letter to Donaldson: On House of Commons letterhead. 22 December 1944.
£35.00

Both items good, on lightly-aged paper, with slight rust staining from paperclip. Typed Letter Signed ('Herbert Morrison') from Morrision to Driberg: 1p., 12mo. 17 lines of text. Concerning 'the difficulties which Private Donaldson says he is experiencing about his discharge from the Army because his certificate of naturalisation has gone astray', the Home Office 'asked the War Office to take every practicable step to recover the lost certificate', and they have written again to the War Office, 'to give them the information about the naturalisation of Private Donaldson'.

Autograph Letter Signed ('T. Mitchell') from the classical scholar Thomas Mitchell to an unnamed editor ('My dear friend'), discussing his work translating Demosthenes.

Author: 
Thomas Mitchell (1783-1845), English classical scholar, who produced a number of editions of Greek authors for the Clarendon Press, Oxford University
Publication details: 
Ramsdon [sic]. 24 January 1822.
£150.00

2pp., 12mo. In a windowpane mount on a leaf removed from an album. The letter itself very good, on aged paper; the mount worn at extremities. He begins by informing the recipient that his 'last Letter has made ample atonement for the provocation of the preceding', and he has 'ever been the foremost, both in word & deed, to keep my wings in motion. I speak this seriously: my former note was only a temporary petulance'. The second paragraph begins: 'I must positively have another Paper for my Orators'. He has 'run to a fearful length, & yet have cramped myself all the way.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Richard Darling') to Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl of Coningsby (while Baron Coningsby of Clanbrassil, County Armagh) from his Dublin agent Richard Darling, discussing his Irish rents and giving figures and names.

Author: 
Richard Darling of Dublin, Ireland [Thomas Coningsby (1656-1729), 1st Earl of Coningsby, formerly Baron Coningsby of Clanbrassil, County Armagh]
Publication details: 
Dublin. 8 March 1693/4.
£220.00

1p., 8vo. Fair, on aged and creased paper. Addressed on reverse 'ffor the Rt. honble thomas Ld. Connigsby att Mr notts the Bookeseller in ye Pall mall | London'. The letter begins: 'My Lord/ | I have this night late got ye. order or Respit for the Surplissage of rent in the of Mr. Kiens and have sent in Closed A Rentroll how I have set ye lands being more than ever they made in ye. best of time'. He gives a figure for Coningsby's rent, of which 'the widdow must have her thirds [...] She is to pay ye. a Third of the Quittrent'.?>

Three financial documents from 1880 on 'Vanity Fair': holograph 'Report' by the editor Thomas Gibson Bowles, accompanying 'Balance Sheet and Profit and Loss Account' and 'Comparative Statement of Income and Expenditure' by accountants Masson & Lewis.

Author: 
Thomas Gibson Bowles (1841-1922), editor of the London society magazine 'Vanity Fair', founded by him in 1868 [Masson & Lewis, Accountants, 27 Leadenhall Street, London]
Publication details: 
Bowles's report dated 10 November 1880. 'Balance Sheet' and 'Comparative Statement' both by Masson & Lewis, Accountants, 27 Leadenhall Street, London, and both for the half-year ending 30 September 1880.
£2,500.00

The three items, all in manuscript, are in good condition, on lightly-aged paper. All three are folded into the usual packets, with the two items by the accountants each titled in manuscript on the outside. Item One (Gibson's report): 'Report to accompany the Accounts of "Vanity Fair" for the six months ending 30th. Septr. 1880'. In Bowles's autograph, and signed by him at the foot, 'Thos. G. Bowles | 10 Novr 1880'. 1p., foolscap 8vo.

Itemised manuscript account of 'Mr. Alexr. J. Murray's Charges in relation to the Sale to Mr. Hanbury of 1/18th. Share in "Vanity Fair"'.

Author: 
Alexander J. Murray, solicitor, 1 Clement's Inn, London [Hanbury; Thomas Gibson Bowles (1841-1922), editor of the London society magazine 'Vanity Fair', founded by him in 1868]
Publication details: 
Entries dating from 1 November 1881 to 1 July 1882. Document carrying tax stamp postmarked 14 March 1883.
£600.00

5pp., foolscap 8vo. Attached with green ribbon. The sale was a protracted affair, and the detailed nature of these accounts may be due to Murray's desire to justify his charges of £22 1s 6d. The first entry reads: '1881 | Novr. 1st. Attending Mr. Bowles on his calling and receiving his instructions to act for all parties in the Sale of 1/18th. Share in "Vanity Fair" and General Roberts Executors would call and hand me the necessary papers [6s 8d]'. Other entries include 'Novr. 28th [1881] Writing Mr. Bowles that the Deed would be ready for his signature tomorrow morning [5s]', 'Jany.

Autograph Letter Signed ('T. H. Burlend') from the zoologist Thomas Harold Burlend to the occultist William Bernard Crow, discussing his paper on 'Periodicity in Classification'.

Author: 
Thomas Harold Burlend, Lecturer in Histology and Embryology, University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire [William Bernard Crow (1895-1976), zoologist and occultist]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, Cardiff, 16 March 1938.
£45.00

1p., 12mo. 22 lines. Good, on lightly-aged paper. Burlend begins his letter: 'Many thanks for your paper on Periodicity in Classification: it is very interesting but in many respects beyond me. | I don't understand why the Polyzoa should be included in the group "True limbs present" as they have nothing suggesting limbs'. | Otherwise the classification for the Animal Kingdom seems more balanced than it is in most text-books.' The second part of the letter discusses specific examples: platypus, aves and mammals.

Autograph Signature ('T N Talfourd') of Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd, English judge, Member of Parliament for Reading in Berkshire, and promoter of copyright reform; as part of frank.

Author: 
Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd (1795-1854), English judge, Member of Parliament for Reading in Berkshire, and author, promoter of copyright reform, and dedicatee of Dickens's 'Pickwick Papers'
Publication details: 
Shrewsbury. 23 March [circa 1829].
£25.00

On 7 x 11 cm rectangle cut from front of envelope. In fair condition, on lightly-aged paper, with glue from mount adhering to reverse, which is docketed in pencil: 'Serjt Talfourd | Readng | Berks'. The frank reads, with the words in square brackets not in Talfourd's hand, unlike the rest: '[Shrewsbury March] Twenty three | [The Very Revd.] The Dean | Hereford | [signed] T N Talfourd'.

Autograph Letter, in the third person, from Elizabeth Charlotte Nugent, Marchioness of Westmeath, to her druggists Messrs Fitz & Ch<ambers?>, ordering 'Canisters of Cephalic snuff' and 'one pound of mustard ground to make Poultices'.

Author: 
Elizabeth Charlotte Nugent [née Verner] (d.1882), Marchioness of Westmeath, wife of George Thomas John Nugent (1785-1871), 1st Marquess of Westmeath
Publication details: 
Cossey [Costessey] Hall, Norfolk. 7 December 1868.
£56.00

2pp., 12mo. On first leaf of bifolium. Good, on lightly-aged paper, with unobtrusive spike hole. The letter begins: 'The Marchioness of Westmeath is much obliged to Mesrrs. Fitz & for the two Canisters of Cephalic snuff sent according to desire & requests they will be so good as to forward by the Bearer three or four more Canisters - Also a box of Pills made up exactly according to the enclosed prescription which Lady Wth.?>

Circular letter, in a secretarial hand, on behalf of the Committee of the Eastern Question Association, London, signed and completed by A. R. Dryhurst, and addressed by him to Thomas Redfern, regarding the publication of speeches by W. E. Gladstone.

Author: 
Alfred Robert ('Roy') Dryhurst (1859-1949), Secretary, The Eastern Question Association, King Street, Westminster [Thomas Redfern; William Ewart Gladstone, Liberal Prime Minister]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of The Eastern Question Association (Appointed by the National Conference), Committee Rooms, 27 and 28, Canada Building, King Street, Westminster. 26 May 1877.
£65.00

2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In fair condition, on lightly-aged paper. Signed 'A R. Dryhurst'. The document begins: 'I am desired by the Committee to inform you that they have resolved to print the speeches revised by himself, which Mr. Gladstone delivered at the beginning and end of the debate on the Eastern Question.' The terms are then given, 'With the view of securing for them, the widest possible circulation'.

Autograph Letter Signed ('M. Combe') from Martha Combe, wife of the 'Printer to the University' Thomas Combe of the Oxford University Press, discussing the terms of lodgings with 'Mrs. Capel', with a reference to 'Mr. Hunt' [William Holman Hunt'].

Author: 
Martha Combe (1806-1893), wife of Thomas Combe (1796-1872), 'Printer to the University' at the Oxford University Press [William Holman Hunt (1827-1910), Pre-Raphaelite painter]
Publication details: 
'The University Press' [Oxford]. 19 April 1862.
£95.00

2pp., 12mo. 14 lines. With the address and date on the second leaf of the bifolium, the top part of which is lacking. Fair, on aged paper. Writing to an unnamed male correspondent, Mrs Combe states that if he should arrive during her absence, he will find his lodgings 'at Mrs. Capel 7. St. Giles's, Pastry Cook'. She describes the terms as '£1 a week including attendance, plate, cooking linen, with a gratuity to the servant at the end of the term'. She concludes: 'I hope Mr.

[Printed pamphlet.] Empire "Socialism" By R. Palme Dutt.

Author: 
R. Palme Dutt [with foreword by 'T. B.', i.e. Thomas Bell (1882-1944), representative of the Communist Party of Great Britain to the Comintern's Executive Committee]
Publication details: 
Published by the Communist Party of Great Britain, 16 King Street, Covent Garden, WC2. ['Printed by Centropress Limited (T.U. Throughout) 168, Camberwell Road, London S.E.5.'] February 1925.
£120.00

20pp, 12mo. Stapled. In red printed wraps, with cartoon on cover showing giant worker sweeping away miniature capitalists. In fair condition: lightly-aged and with central vertical fold. Scarce: the only copies on COPAC at the British Library and Warwick University.

Autograph draft of a circular letter by the comedian Tommy Trinder urging Equity members to vote in favour of Sunday opening in a wartime ballot on that question. With a typescript of the circular, and a printed facsimile of Trinder's signature.

Author: 
Tommy Trinder [Thomas Edward Trinder] (1909-1989), English stage, screen and radio comedian with the catchphrase 'You lucky people!' [C.A.S.T., Campaign of Actors for Sunday Theatres, 1943]
Publication details: 
Undated [1943].
£120.00

The three items are stapled to one another, in good condition on lightly-aged paper. The first item is the typescript, which is 1p., 4to. It is addressed to 'Dear Brother Artist,' and begins: 'You will possibly be rather surprised to receive a letter from me, but after having spent most of my life in the Provinces, I now find myself landed in London. I am surprised at the amount of discussion and activity that takes place here regarding the "politics" of the theatre - and realise how you in the Provinces are apt to get left out.

Autograph Letter Signed ('W. Trollope') from Rev. William Trollope, classics master at Christ's Hospital, offering the London publishers Cadell & Davies his 'Analecta Theologica'. Together with the a statement of account by Cadell & Davies.

Author: 
Rev. William Trollope (1798-1863), MA, Pembroke College, Cambridge, one of the masters of Christ's Hospital [Cadell & Davies, London publishers; Thomas Cadell (1773-1836); William Davies]
Publication details: 
Trollope's letter: Christs Hospital. 12 September 1827. The statement of account at 28 December 1829 (volume 1) and August 1835 (volume 2).
£166.00

Trollope's letter: 3pp., 12mo. 48 lines. Bifolium. In fair condition, on aged paper. Addressed, with postmarks, on reverse of second leaf, to 'Messrs. Cadell & Co. | Booksellers | Strand.' Trollope begins by announcing that he has 'a work nearly ready for the Press, wh. may probably be worth your attention [...] It is designed as companion to Mr Horne's work on the Scriptures, of wh. as you are the publishers, you may perhaps have no objection to engage in another, wh.

Autograph Card Signed ('Geo R Sims') from the dramatist George R. Sims thanking Thomas Hutchinson for a letter, with reference to a visit to Liverpool.

Author: 
George R. Sims [George Robert Sims] (1847-1922), English dramatist and author [Thomas Hutchinson]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 12 Clarence Terrace, Regent's Park, NW [London]. 7 September 1900.
£30.00

The letterhead includes a facsimile of Sims's signature. Six lines, on one side of the card. Addressed at foot to 'Thos Hutchinson Esq.' Fair, on aged paper, with strip of gummed paper from mount at head of blank reverse. He sends 'a thousand thanks' for Hutchinson's 'kind letter on Sep 2', which he would have answered earlier, had he not been 'away at Liverpool'. He concludes: 'Your good wishes lay upon my table to welcome me home.'

Autograph Letter Signed from the poet Henry Rowe, Rector of Ringshall, Suffolk, to his publishers [Cadell & Davies], rejecting an offer from them, and making a counter-offer, regarding the stock of 'Poem's, published two years before.

Author: 
Rev. Henry Rowe (1753-1819), Rector of Ringshall, Suffolk, and poet, educated at Eton and Brasenose College, Oxford, related to Samuel Rogers [Thomas Cadell, jnr (1773-1836); William Davies (d.1819)]
Publication details: 
No place. 26 February 1798.
£120.00

1p., 8vo. Fair, on lightly-aged paper. Docketed on reverse: 'Rev: Mr. Rowe | Feby. 1798'. Signed 'Henry Rowe' and addressed 'Gentlemen' (from the context clearly his publishers). The letter concerns Rowe's 'Poem's (London: Cadell & Davies, 1792), published, according to the British Critic, 'with the hope of alleviating the distresses of the author and his family'. The letter begins: 'The proposal you made of delivering me Fifteen Copies for Five Pound, will in no respect answer my purpose'.

Printed handbill anti-Catholic poem by Mary Frances Tupper of Albury, titled 'The Ritualists, Beware! They are Fooling Thee.'

Author: 
Mary Frances Tupper, daughter of the poet Martin Farquhar Tupper (1810-1889) [the Middle Hill Press of Sir Thomas Phillipps]
Publication details: 
Without date or place. [Cheltenham: Middle Hill Press, 1870.]
£150.00

On one side of a piece of wove paper, 15.5 x 9.5 cm. In fair condition, on aged paper, with one creased corner and a small nick at the head. The drop-head title is in capitals, with the second line having only the opening quotation marks (before the initial word 'BEWARE'). The poem is 29 lines long, with three seven-line stanzas followed by an eight-line one. At the foot of the poem: 'Albury. Mary Frances Tupper.' The first stanza reads 'The stamp of Rome is on their heart, | Take care! take care! | They play the Jesuits' crafty part, | Beware! beware!

Autograph draft by Thomas George Baring, 1st Earl Northbrook, of a speech delivered by him, as First Lord of the Admiralty at the Lord Mayor's Banquet, Guildhall, 1883.

Author: 
Thomas George Baring (1826-1904), 1st Earl of Northbrook, Liberal politician; Viceroy of India, 1872-1876; First Lord of the Admiralty, 1880-1885
Publication details: 
On embossed Admiralty letterhead. [1883.]
£90.00

2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In pencil. Lightly-aged and worn. In pencil, with deletions and emendations. Docketed in another hand on reverse of second leaf: 'MS. speech delivered at Guildhall Banquet by Lord Northbrook, First Lord of Admiralty - 9th Novr. 1883.' And with the following in the second hand at the head of the first page: 'Lord Northbrook's Speech - Nov. 9. 1883 at Guildhall'. A very short speech, well reported in The Times of 10 November 1883.

Long Autograph Letter from English-born jurist and adviser to Japan on foreign affairs Thomas Baty to 'My dear Cooper', presenting a detailed defence of the Japanese position after the Nanking Massacre, and of Franco in the Spanish Civil War.

Author: 
Thomas Baty (1869-1954), English-born jurist and authority on international law, who settled in Japan in 1916 as foreign legal adviser [Nanking Massacre; Second Sino-Japanese War; Spanish Civil War]
Publication details: 
'Tokio [Tokyo] 1 October, 1937'.
£2,600.00

A letter of the first importance, as Baty had been since 1916 foreign legal adviser to the Japanese Government (following the death of Henry Willard Denison), and had been part of the Japanese delegation to the 1927 Geneva disarmament conference. Such was Baty's support for the Japanese position that the British Government seriously considered trying him for treason following the Second World War, choosing instead to revoke his British citizenship. 5pp., 4to. The first five pages of the letter only, and so lacking the signature, although Baty is without doubt the author.

Autograph Letter Signed from the Whig politician Thomas Spring Rice [later Lord Mounteagle] to E. Moran of the Dublin Evening Post, describing '5 long years [...] devoted to the one object namely Limerick', 'Irish affairs' and 'the Catholic cause'.

Author: 
Thomas Spring Rice (1790-1866), 1st Baron Monteagle of Brandon, Anglo-Irish Whig politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer, 1835 to 1839
Publication details: 
[London. 1826.]
£450.00

4pp., 8vo, and 2pp., 4to. Signed 'Spring Rice'. The first 4pp. are on a 4to leaf folded once to make 4pp., 8vo, and the last 2pp., 4to, are on the first leaf of a bifolium. In fair condition, on aged and worn paper. Addressed, on the reverse of the second leaf of the bifolium: 'Private | E Morgan | Dublin Evening Post Office | Trinity St'. Spring Rice begins by thanking Moran and 'Mr Conway' [Frederick William Conway (1782-1853), Moran's editor at the Dublin Evening Post] for their communications.

Printed paper on 'Occupation', giving the position on 'annexation' and 'settlement' of a 'civilised State' in international law, with a section on 'The West African Conference of 1884-1885', and a reference to 'the original uncivilised inhabitants'.

Author: 
[Thomas Joseph Lawrence (1849-1920), Fellow and Tutor of Downing College, Cambridge, and authority on International Law; The West African Conference of 1884-1885]
Publication details: 
Without date or place. [Cambridge. 1890.]
£150.00

A significant document, providing a clear exposition of the late-Victorian colonialist position on the two branches of occupation: annexation and settlement. Untraced. T. J. Lawrence of Downing College is the probable author, as the section on 'annexation' also features in his 'Handbook of Public International Law' (1890). 1p., 8vo. Printed in landscape on one side of a piece of unwatermarked laid paper. In fair condition, lightly-aged and creased. The document begins: 'Occupation in International Law applies only to territory not previously held by a civilised State.

[Printed handbill poem in the style of Rev. Richard Harris Barham.] Ye Legend of Ye Wrekin. By Thomas Ingoldsby.

Publication details: 
Without date or place. [Shrewsbury? 1850s?]
£120.00

1p., 8vo. Fair, on lightly-aged laid paper watermarked 'J ALLEN & SONS | SUPER FINE', with slight wear to extremities. A long poem, printed in two columns of small type. Although claiming to be by 'Thomas Ingoldsby', and written in the style of 'The Ingoldsby Legends', the poem is not by Rev. Richard Harris Barham.

Printed certificate by J. Dawson of a deposition in the cause between Thomas Bonnell and the Right Hon. Henry Fox: 'Surry. | This is to certify that John Davies came this 8th Day of July, 1761, before me, and made Oath as follows:'

Publication details: 
[London: 1761.]
£120.00

2pp., 12mo. Unpaginated. On laid paper. In fair condition: lightly-aged and creased. The deposition begins: 'JOHN Davies, Servant to Thomas Bonnell, Gent. maketh Oath that on or about the 15th Day of June last Mr. Ford, of Coleman-street-Buildings, who is employed as Attorney or Sollictor [sic] for the Right Hon. Henry Fox, Esq; against the said Thomas Bonell, [sic] gave to this Deponent half a Guinea, and promised him, in case he would bring any Books, Letters or Papers of his said Master's, that Mr. Fox would pay him, and make him an honorable Recompence for so doing.

Bulletins and other printed ephemera published by The Shelley Society, [1885]-1888.

Publication details: 
[London, 1885]-1888.
£750.00

Ten items, all 12mo, printed wraps, sewn as issued (except one, not sewn as issued), light foxing, mainly good condition (two somewhat battered), two bulletins have the colophon of Richard Clay, Wise's printers of choice, as follows: 1. Bulletin (for want of a better word), 16pp., inc. Prospectus dated 8 Dec. 1885, subscription requested for 1 Jan. 1886, Secretary Sydney E. Preston, listing prospective publications for 1886, and further "Publications Suggested", Lists of Committee and Members, anticipating Alma Murray's "The Cenci"; 2.

Calligraphic manuscript titled 'Menander | 345?-293 B.C. | Translations by various hands selected from "From the Greek" edited by T. F. Higham and C. M. Bowra', containing translations by C. M. Bowra, Lord Byron and Gilbert Murray.

Author: 
Anonymous [Sir Maurice Bowra (1869-1947); T. F. Higham [Thomas Farrant Higham] (1890-1975); George Gordon Noel (1788-1824), Lord Byron; Gilbert Murray (1866-1957); Menander]
Publication details: 
Without date and place, but after 1943.
£120.00

7pp., 4to. On three bifoliums and two single leaves of watermarked laid paper, all loose, with the bifoliums placed inside one another and the single leaves inserted after the title. Very good, on lightly-aged paper. Written out in black ink, with the titles in red ink, in an excellent uncial hand. The five translations are 'My Own, my Native Land' and 'The Family Dinner-Party', both by Bowra; 'This World is all a Fleeting Show' and 'This defileth a Man', both by Murray; and 'Whom the Gods love', by Byron.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Brassey') from Brassey to 'P. Michelli [later Sir Pietro James Michelli], Esq | Secretary | Seaman's Hospital', regretting that he was not able to visit the Albert Docks.

Author: 
Thomas Brassey, 1st Earl Brassey [Lord Brassey] (1836-1918), Liberal politician [Sir Pietro James Michelli (1853–1935), Secretary, Seaman's Hospital; Albert Dock Seaman's Hospital]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 24 Park Lane, W. [London]. 16 July 1889.
£56.00

1p., 12mo. Fair, on lightly-aged paper, with short closed tear to one edge and traces of mount on blank second leaf of bifolium. Signature slightly smudged. Brassey writes that he has been 'detained at the House of Lords, where I have been acting as chairman of a private committee', and as a result 'found it impossible to go down to the Albert Docks yesterday afternoon'. The letter almost certainly relates to the Albert Dock Seaman's Hospital, which was officially opened the following year, as a branch of the Dreadnought Seamen's Hospital, Greenwich.

Autograph Letter Signed from the Scottish painter Thomas Faed inviting a fellow-painter to his studio, and expressing concern that his paintings may get 'massacred [...] in the hanging'.

Author: 
Thomas Faed (1826-1900), RSA, Scottish painter
Publication details: 
24a Cavendish Rd, St John's Wood [London]. 3 April [post 1876].
£80.00

3pp., 12mo. Bifolium. Watermarked 'JOYNSON | 1876'. Fair, on lightly-aged paper, with minor staining from mount at foot of second leaf. Written in a hasty, untidy hand. The recipient appears to be 'My dear Hornby', 'Horley' or 'Howley'. Faed writes that he is 'slaving away chopping and changing sometimes worse and sometimes better (I hope) on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. 7th.

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